Saturday, July 29, 2017

July Week 5: Remember Christ

From last week: when you have a mint or something minty, what are you supposed to remember?









How to Always Remember Christ

Activity on trying to memorize something
- Simon
- Memory matching game

When we are baptized and take the sacrament, we promise to "always remember" Christ.  It's easier said than done.

Read Helaman 12:1-5
- in summary, we get lazy and forget

How do you go about trying to remember something?
- for a test
- a person's name
- what you need to buy at the store
- any list

Why do we forget?

What is it like dealing with a person who forgets things?

What must it be like for God when we forget him and his son?

How can we improve at always remembering Christ?

Here are 8 strategies for improving your ability to remember:
1. Become interested in what you're learning
     i. How can we become more interested in Christ? (write answers)
2. Find a way to leverage your visual memory
i. One trick for quickly memorizing new peoples' names is to associate their name with something visual.  For example, you meet someone at a party named Mike and he has large ears.  Mike -> microphone -> he cleans his ears with the microphone … weird but it works.
ii. Maybe you can find a way to remember Christ in various parts of your day.  Create a visual
3. Chunking; to memorize 467890, it's easier to remember 467 & 890, rather than six numbers.
i. How could this apply to remembering Christ?
4. Associate what you're trying to remember with something you already know
i. You can use mnemonics to remember something about Christ that will help you
5. Write out things, over and over again
i. Journaling, or sharing experiences (i.e. telling stories) will reinforce lessons
6. Summarize as you learn and as you try to remember
i. Leverage writing to simply summarize what you're trying to remember.  Have you had a powerful spiritual experience and you want to remember it to help you remember Christ?  Then summarize it and write it down.
7. Memorize in the afternoon

8. Get enough sleep

If there is enough time, divide the class into three groups and have them scan through one of the talks below for tips on remembering Christ and then have them share.

Always Remember Him by Gerrit Gong
That They do Always Remember Him by Claudio Costa
To Always Remember Him by Todd Christofferson

Friday, July 21, 2017

July Week 4: Making the Sacrament Meaningful

Opening Activity
What were you thinking about 15 minutes ago?

Review
As discussed a couple of weeks ago, the purpose of ordinances is to see God and live - to enter His presence and remain there.  Furthermore, ordinances are symbolic and tied to duties.  When we participate in those symbolic rituals, we ought to think of what they stand for as well as what our duties are in connection to that ordinance.

The Sacrament Ordinance
Read Matthew 26:26-28


- What do you think of this re-enactment of the Last Supper?
- How does it differ from your experience in Sacrament Meeting?

The Last Supper was intimate and personal.  It seems to have been more like a quiet dinner party than a formal, solemn ordinance.

What do you think the disciples were thinking when Jesus began to wash their feet and feed them?

I think it would have been a bit awkward to have Jesus or anyone wash my feet.  But to have him break bread and share his wine with me, not so much.

A Service to Others, Who Desire to Serve Others (or Reciprocity)
Jesus served his disciples, by washing their feet and feeding them.  It was a an intimate act of service.  He would later bleed from every pore of his body, be beaten and whipped by soldiers, be forced to carry this cross he would be crucified on and he would later suffer and die.  He carried out the greatest act of service for his friends and for us.

In return, he asked that we love one another as he has loved us.

Two weeks ago, I was admitted to the hospital for an important heart procedure.  After the procedure was completed, my dear wife was there to greet me and then remained with me in the hospital while I recovered.  She helped me with a lot of things I could not do on my own.  This was just a minor example of how she did something uniquely special to me.  For this act of love, along with many other acts of love and kindness from her, I have this strong urge to return the favors and to serve her.

This desire to serve in return is backed by science.  In the world of persuasion science, this is called reciprocity.

An example (source):
Three groups of waiters were given different instructions.

The first group studied had waiters giving mints along with the check, making no mention of the mints themselves. This increased tips by around 3% against the control group.

The second group had waiters bring out two mints by hand, and they mentioned them to the table ("Would anyone like some mints before they leave?"). Tips increased by 14% against the control group.

The last group had waiters bring out the check first along with a few mints. A short time afterward, the waiter came back with another set of mints, and let customers know that they had brought out more mints, in case they wanted another.

This last test was where waiters saw a 21% increase in tips versus the control group.

At first glance, the last two groups seem very similar: two mints per-person were brought out, and the waiter mentioned them.

So, what was different?

The difference was personalization - making the service intimate or unique.

How does this apply to the Atonement and the Sacrament?  Since Jesus is not here to actually serve us, we are left to our own devices to make the Sacrament meaningful for us.  Often, to make the Sacrament personal, meditation and contemplation are required.  We cannot thoughtlessly approach the Sacrament and expect to get anything out of it.  Rather, we need to make an effort to be there in the same room as Jesus and his disciples at the Last Supper; we need to visit the Garden of Gethsemane; we need to see Christ hang on the cross and bleed for us.

As we make it personal, we begin to have a desire to love Jesus and in turn, have greater love for others.

Ideas to Help Make the Sacrament More Personal
- examine thyself! (1 Corinthians 11:28)
how did you do in serving others in the prior week?
how have you improved at living a more virtuous life?
what will you do differently this next week?
consider keeping a journal to mark your progress each week

- think of Jesus' sacrifice during the Sacrament
listen to the hymn, read the words again
meditate and try to place yourself at the feet of Jesus
recite scripture (i.e. Mosiah 14)

- study the meaning of a broken heart and contrite spirit
read this blog post

Closing Activity
We started off the class with "what were you thinking about 15 minutes ago?" and we see your answers here on the board.  What will you think about next week when you partake of the Sacrament?


Saturday, July 01, 2017

July Week 1: Ordinances

What is the purpose of ordinances?

Quickly review the events in the Garden of Eden.  God created Adam and Eve, who were perfect in body and innocent in mind.  They were place in the garden, commanded to have children and commanded not to eat of the tree of knowledge of good and evil.  Satan came, and tempted them to eat the fruit; they ate and were cast out of the garden and more importantly, they left God's presence.  Ever since then, humans have been trying to get back to God to live with him.

Read Moses 1:1-24
Pay particular attention to verses, 5, 10-11



D&C 84:19-22
19 And this greater priesthood administereth the gospel and holdeth the key of the mysteries of the kingdom, even the key of the knowledge of God.

20 Therefore, in the ordinances thereof, the power of godliness is manifest.

21 And without the ordinances thereof, and the authority of the priesthood, the power of godliness is not manifest unto men in the flesh;

22 For without this no man can see the face of God, even the Father, and live.

The whole point of ordinances is to help us prepare to meet God and live in his presence.  Ordinances are symbolic and teach and remind us of our duties to God and others.  Each ordinance is tied to a duty - always a duty to God or a duty to others.  As we fulfill these duties, we prepare ourselves to meet and live with God again.

What are the ordinances?

Saving Ordinances
- Baptism
- Confirmation
- Melchizedek Priesthood ordination
- Temple endowment (washing/anointing, receiving tokens and signs)
- Marriage sealing

Other Ordinances
- Sacrament (memorial ordinance)
- Washing feet (for apostles; see this link)
- Naming and blessing of children
- Oil consecration
- Blessing sick

Symbols

What is a symbol?

Think of song The Star Spangled Banner and how our flag should remind us of the sacrifices our fore-fathers made and when we see the stars, stripes, red, while and blue, we ought to think about them and be grateful for what we enjoy.

My ring is a symbol of my love and commitment to Jill.

Just this week, an author I enjoy reading, produced a little coin called a memento mori which is supposed to remind the person who carries it around, that they will die soon and they ought to treat each day as a gift.

Symbols represent something or an idea.  And when we see the symbol, we ought to remember whatever it is we are supposed to remember or we ought to do whatever it is we ought to do.

How we learn from ordinances

Divide class in half.  One half will focus on baptism and the other half on sacrament.

They will search and then share:
1. What does the ordinance symbolize
2. What does the ordinance teach
     - what should we remember
     - how should we act and live / fulfill our duties

They should be prepared to share a quote from the scriptures or from a talk.  They can use the chalkboard or anything else to help demonstrate the symbol and what it is we are supposed to remember or do when we see that symbol.